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All Resources

Title Not Sorted Type Not Sorted Contributor Sorted Descending Arrow Year Not Sorted
open close toggle BFF (Be a Friend First) Tips & Facts Girl Scouts of the USA 2012

BFF (Be a Friend First) a title selected by middle school girls, was created to help them develop healthy relationship skills, understand relational aggression, and learn about conflict resolution and bullying prevention. Based on Girl Scouts of the USA’s aMAZE! Journey leadership curriculum, the activities and content in BFF are correlated to national and state standards, particularly character education, service learning, and written communication skills. Girls begin BFF by understanding how to develop healthy friendships. They then learn to deal with relational aggression and bullying in their own relationships. Finally, they lead with friendship in their schools and communities by taking action to prevent bully behavior. BFF is tailored to girls’ specific interests and needs. It is based on extensive research on girls’ relationships and bullying behavior, conducted by the Girl Scout Research Institute, as well as focus groups with middle school girls from across the country. BFF was developed to address girl-bullying specifically, and during the years when it is most prevalent. Facilitated by trained community volunteers in middle schools, faith or community-based settings, BFF is designed to create opportunities for girls to share their experiences, gain skills for developing meaningful friendships through games and role plays, and practice resolving conflict in healthy ways. Importantly, girls will work on a project of their own design to address bullying in their schools or larger communities. This is a key part of the Girl Scout Leadership Experience—taking action to make the world a better place—an empowering experience for girls on this or any issue! BFF Sample Eight Session Overview • First Impressions in the Maze • Navigating Friendships • Cliques and Conflicts • Caution: Bullies Straight Ahead • Let Peace Begin with You • Improving Relationship and the World • Toward Peace: Take Action! • Pass it Forward BFF is free of charge and schools and community groups need only contact their local Girl Scout Council (www.girlscouts.org/councilfinder/) to initiate program and partnership. Print resources in English or Spanish are available to volunteers interested in facilitating the program and can be obtained from the local Council or online via the BFF facilitator community: http://gsuniv.org/BFFfacilitators/. Additional online games, quizzes, activities and videos for girls are available at: http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/BFF/. For more information and video stories, go to: www.girlscouts.org/program/journeys/BFF/default.asp.

Topics: Prevention, Respond to Bullying, Kids, Schools, Cyberbullying, Youth Development, Healthy Relationships

For more info please visit http://forgirls.girlscouts.org/BFF/ Site exit disclaimer

open close toggle Golden Rule Pledge Bullying Prevention Resources Tips & Facts Golden Rule Pledge

These resources are designed to be used with adolescents in religious education, Sunday schools, youth group meetings or any primarily Christian audience. They affirm the worth and dignity of all students. Specifically, they are designed to address and eliminate anti-gay bullying and harassment by adherents of Christianity. Materials encourage adherence to the Golden Rule and other teaching on civility and mutual respect.

Topics: Prevention, LGBT

For more info please visit http://goldenrulepledge.com/grpresources/ Site exit disclaimer

open close toggle Invisible Targets Research Great Schools 2010

This article discusses the bullying of students with disabilities by telling the story of Gabriella, a student with ADHD.

Topics: Disabilities & Special Needs

For more info please visit http://www.greatschools.org/special-education/legal-rights/1599-bullying-and-kids-with-disabilities.gs Site exit disclaimer

open close toggle Help Your Intellectually Disabled Child Handle Bullying Tips & Facts Hartwell-Walker, M 2011

Children with intellectual disabilities are particularly prone to bullying. This article addresses how parents can help their children with intellectual disabilities handle bullying and bullies.

Topics: Disabilities & Special Needs

For more info please visit http://psychcentral.com/lib/2011/help-your-intellectually-disabled-child-handle-bullying/ Site exit disclaimer

open close toggle Bullying Among Children and Youth with Disabilities and Special Health Needs Tip Sheet Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2012

Children with disabilities—such as physical, developmental, intellectual, emotional, and sensory disabilities—are at an increased risk of being bullied. Any number of factors— physical vulnerability, social skill challenges, or intolerant environments—may increase the risk. Research suggests that some children with disabilities may bully others as well.

Topics: Disabilities & Special Needs, Prevention, Respond to Bullying

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/at-risk/groups/special-needs/BullyingTipSheet.pdf

open close toggle Bullying Among Children and Youth on Perceptions and Differences in Sexual Orientation Tip Sheet Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2012

Children and youth who identify themselves as lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender (LGBT), or are perceived to be so, can face unrelenting teasing and bullying by their peers. Because this aggression can be sexual in nature, the effects closely resemble those of sexual harassment and in some cases may constitute sexual harassment.

Topics: LGBT, Respond to Bullying

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/at-risk/groups/lgbt/lgbtyouthtipsheet.pdf

open close toggle Understanding Bullying Within the Camp Setting: Tips for Parents Tip Sheet Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2011

Camp is similar to school and other settings in which children and youth gather—in that bullying does occur. Children engaging in new activities, meeting new friends, establishing varying social groups at camp, and sharing living quarters with other campers present challenges to even the most well-adjusted child.

Topics: Youth Development, Prevention, Respond to Bullying

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/resources-files/bullying-at-camp-tipsheet.pdf

open close toggle Bullying in Out-of-School Time Programs: Tips for Youth-Serving Professionals and Volunteers Tip Sheet Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2011

Out-of-school time programs fill the gap for working parents and communities concerned about how and where youth spend their free time. Professionals and volunteers in this field cover a diverse range of activities and organizations.

Topics: Youth Development, Prevention, Respond to Bullying

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/resources-files/bullying-out-of-school-tipsheet.pdf

open close toggle Working with Young People Who Bully Others: Tips for Mental Health Professionals Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2011

Mental health professionals have important roles in helping to change the behavior of youth who bully others. To be effective, mental health professionals need a clear understanding of the roots of bullying behavior and a focus on those strategies that are likely to work. It is also important to understand what approaches may inadvertently make the bullying behavior worse.

Topics: Respond to Bullying, Healthy Relationships, Youth Development

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/resources-files/young-people-who-bully-others-tipsheet.pdf

open close toggle Roles for Health and Safety Professionals in Bullying Prevention and Intervention Tip Sheet Tips & Facts Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) 2011

Health and safety professionals and volunteers are disturbed about the physical and psychosocial harm experienced by many youth as a result of bullying by their peers. There is no one single cause of bullying among children. Rather, individual, family, peer, school, and community factors can place a child or youth at risk for bullying his or her peers.

Topics: Prevention, Respond to Bullying

For more info please visit http://www.stopbullying.gov/resources-files/roles-for-health-professionals-tipsheet.pdf