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Category Archives for Secondary school

  • Posted: May 10, 2016

    Community policing is a philosophy revolving around the concept of law enforcement and the community working together to ensure public safety for all in the community. By engaging in partnerships, problem solving, and organizational change, a law enforcement agency can approach public safety in a comprehensive, proactive method. Community policing is neither a program nor a single policing unit, however, it is a philosophy that involves all within the agency and the community.

    Community policing can be applied to any setting, including schools. By following community policing, school resource officers (SROs) and school safety personnel can contribute to a productive and enriching environment for students, teachers, and administrators alike. SROs are able to be a strong role model for students all while providing positive interactions between youth and law enforcement.

    For some students, the SRO provides them an opportunity to interact with law enforcement in a non-confrontational and positive manner. It is important that schools and law enforcement agencies enter... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: March 17, 2016
    Teacher sitting with student

    Youth-adult partnerships involve multiple youth working together with multiple adults to address issues that are important to the overall health of people, groups and communities. A goal of these partnerships is to stimulate youth to develop social responsibility – a crucial factor in the promotion of health and well-being. Research ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: February 9, 2016
    children holding hands

    Not since the days and months immediately after September 11 has the Muslim community faced the level of anti-Muslim bias and bullying that has been seen over the past several months. In the wake of Paris and other terrorist attacks, combined with the emergence of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a lack of information among the public about Islam, and the tendency to associate  Islam with terrorism, there has been an increase in expressions and incidents
    targeting the Muslim community and those who are perceived to be Muslim, such as members of the Sikh community. There has also been an increased wave of anti-Muslim sentiment in our public discourse, political rhetoric and everyday interactions.  Schools have not been immune. Youth have been called, “terrorists” or “ISIS.” There have been... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: January 14, 2016
    leslie preddy headshot

    The library is one of the safe places at school – where everyone can feel welcome and comfortable asking for advice and resources. Librarians are nurturers, caregivers and protectors.

    We take this role especially seriously at our middle school, where 57 percent of our students qualify for free or reduced lunch, and many are transitioning to the United States from other countries. This year we emphasized that it’s possible to overcome a reputation our students may not be proud of – online and offline. We can all have second chances.

    We’ve built our school as a community. As educators, we have the greatest impact on our students when we help them develop both a sense of self and community.  We’ve found that a key piece of bullying prevention lies in helping students feel like they are part of something bigger than themselves.

    Our school builds many of these kinds of... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 21, 2015
    Girl comforting friend.

    Throughout the year, StopBullying.gov featured a series of blog posts co-authored by bullying prevention subject matter experts at the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) and other key partner organizations. The series, called “Take Action Today” shared compelling and personal stories of teachers, school nurses, law enforcement officials, and others who work every day to prevent bullying in their schools and communities. The collective efforts of these groups, such as the United National Indian Tribal Youth (UNITY), Sesame Workshop and the National Association of School Resource Officers (NASRO) are helping to create safer social climates for children and youth across the country.

    In recognition of October being Bullying Prevention Awareness month,... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 14, 2015
    Melissa Mercado headshot

    Longer ago than I like to admit, I was a Puerto Rican middle school student. I remember witnessing fellow Hispanic or Latino kids endure name calling and rumor spreading nearly every day over many years. I also recall hearing about other kids being beaten up or getting physically hurt because of bullying. Personally, I experienced bullying through social isolation — hearing after the fact from my  peers about how much fun they all had at that awesome birthday party, quinceañero (Sweet 15th), movie or beach outing to which I was not invited.

    Why were my friends and I targeted? Was it because we were Hispanic? Not at all. We were all Puerto Rican kids, growing up and attending school in Puerto Rico (a U.S. territory), and being bullied by kids of our same ethnicity.

    But we were seen as... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: September 10, 2015
    line graph depicting aggression levels for students grades 6 through 12

    Bullying can take many forms: hitting or pushing (physical bullying), teasing or calling others bad names (verbal bullying).  And it also involves relational forms, such as manipulating peer relationships by spreading nasty rumors, threatening to terminate friendships or excluding someone from a social group.  Students who are bullied in any of these ways may suffer from depression and anxiety, and have academic problems.  

    In the past two decades, relational aggression has received an abundance of media attention.  Books, movies and websites have portrayed girls as being cruel to one another, thus creating and reinforcing the stereotype of “mean girls.” However, this popular perception of girls being meaner than boys is not always supported by research. While data from the U.S. Department of Education shows some differences between how boys and girls experience bullying – for example, girls were more... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: June 10, 2015
    Students walking with backpacks.

    The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence in partnership with Born This Way Foundation (founded by Lady Gaga and her mother, Cynthia Germanotta) are launching a national campaign, the Emotion Revolution, to learn more about how high school students currently feel in school, how they hope to feel, and what is needed to bridge the gap. The goal is to push our nation’s education system toward creating the best possible learning environments through evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL).

    The campaign is launching with an anonymous, nationwide survey of high school students developed by the Center’s research team. The immediate goal is to use the results to create an emotion climate map of the U.S. and to be able to see the similarities and differences across gender, ethnicity, and geographic location. A second goal is to use this information to encourage... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: May 27, 2015
    Dr. Stephen West

    Bullying is tough on all kids. A few years back, I had to deal with a situation in a middle school that exemplifies this. There was a young lady who had been called terrible names on the bus for more than a month.  As her frustration and humiliation became too much, she came to school with a stick and assaulted the young man who was bullying her.  As a result, not only did the young man who was bullying her have consequences, but so she did as well because of her reactive actions. It really showed me how complex bullying can be, and the importance of encouraging students to report incidents and of addressing these issues before they escalate. If she had reached out for assistance, instead of suffering in silence then using violence to stop the bullying, there may have been a different outcome.  It’s one of... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: May 15, 2015

    Bullying remains a serious issue for students and their families, and efforts to reduce bullying concern policy makers, administrators, and educators. According to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, “As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially. The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools.” This is why we are so pleased to share that, after remaining virtually unchanged for close to a decade, new data indicate that the prevalence of bullying is at a record low.

    According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics latest School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey, in 2013, the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent since 2005.

    “The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention


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