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  • Posted: January 17, 2017
    Pediatrician examining child

    Pediatrician examining child 

    Pediatric health care providers are an important, front line, family-trusted group that can not only detect the warning signs of victimization, but are also in a position to advise parents and advocate for their patients. It is important for health care providers to be prepared to screen and counsel children for bullying during both routine health maintenance exams and illness visits.

     

    More than one in four children in America says he or she has experienced being bullied, but only 20-30% of those children ever report it to an adult. This startling statistic can be troublesome for parents,... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: January 10, 2017
    Girl with hijab drinking coffee with friends
    An Interview with Sameera Ahmed, Ph.D., Director of The Family & Youth Institute

    In today’s environment, incidents of bullying against Muslim youth have risen, resulting in concern for schools and youth organizations. I spoke with Sameera Ahmed, Ph.D., Director of The Family & Youth Institute and a leading researcher on American Muslim youth, about what mentoring practitioners can do to build supportive and inclusive programs that meet the needs of Muslim youth and families, while promoting the safety and inclusion of all participants.

    Girl with hijab drinking coffee with friends

    ... Continue Reading
    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: December 19, 2016

    Media coverage of social issues has a profound impact on how communities understand and address problems. Research and expert opinion suggest that certain trends in media coverage of bullying have the potential to do harm. In fact, an analysis of media articles has shown that certain elements of bullying stories are often missing key information, which can lead to misrepresentation of the facts. And, news stories may not be an indication of a trend--journalists are often reporting local incidents.

    In light of recent news coverage, it is important to revisit what science has shown regarding bullying, how to prevent it, the impact it has on those who... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: November 21, 2016

    All children deserve a chance—a chance to be safe, to be educated and to be themselves. Too often, this chance is denied to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning/queer, intersex, gender nonconforming (LGBTQI-GNC) and Two-Spirit* youth. Many of these youth are rejected by their families and bullied by their peers. The lack of familial and peer support can lead LGBTQI-GNC youth into the juvenile justice system, where they may also face abuse or harassment.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is the only federal agency focused solely on the needs of youth in the juvenile justice system—and that includes LGBTQI-GNC and Two-Spirit youth. We must acknowledge the challenges that this youth population faces every day and the opportunities that we all have to help them succeed.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 27, 2016

    What is Cyberbullying?

    Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers, and tablets as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites. Cyberbullying is similar to traditional bullying in many ways; however, the main difference from traditional bullying, is that it doesn’t stop when the child is in the safety of his/her own home. A child who is cyberbullied is likely to be bullied at school as well. Cyberbullying can be relentless, prohibiting an escape for the victim, which can severely damage a child’s mental health and negatively affect self-esteem.

     When a child is bullied at school or on the playground, he knows who his bully is.  The “anonymity” associated with cyberbullying often leaves the victim feeling like he/she has no... Continue Reading

    Posted in Cyberbullying
  • Posted: October 25, 2016

    For the Navajo people, the concept of K’e, or kinship, is one of the most fundamental lessons taught to every child. This begins with the child learning their four inherited clans, which connects them to extended families within the tribal nation. The child is then taught what to call those with whom they share a clan—strangers may acquire titles such as mother or brother through this system—, and the specific set of mutual responsibilities that accompany these terms. To demonstrate the importance of having a positive, inclusive community during National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, StopBullying.Gov is honored to share the experiences of Sam Slater, a member of the Navajo Nation.

    “Growing up, this was the most powerful anti-bullying tool in my belt. K’e demonstrated for me how to treat everyone like a relative. This meant understanding my role in helping and learning from other people. We raise one another up and value the individuality of our collective voice, further extending these teachings into a compassionate community and beyond.

    “... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 17, 2016

    Bullying is a big problem for many children and teens, and especially for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. 

    Data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) show that in the year before the survey:

    34% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were bullied on school property 28% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were electronically bullied, and 13% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students did not go to school because of safety concerns.

    While nationally representative data are not yet available based on gender identity, we know that transgender youth often suffer even higher levels of bullying and violence than their non-transgender peers.

    For all groups, bullying is linked to poor outcomes, including poor mental health, substance use, suicide, and academic problems. A... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 12, 2016
    Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sexual Identity, 2015, Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sex of Sexual Contact, 2015

    Every other year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) administers the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in high schools across the U.S. In the 2015 survey, two items were included to capture sexual orientation - self-reported sexual identity and the sex of sexual contacts. The results, found here, provide current national estimates of the percentage of high school students who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual or are not sure of their sexual identity and the percentage of high school students who have had sexual contact with only the same sex or with both sexes. In addition, the publication provides estimates of many health-related behaviors by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts.

    Nationwide, 89% of high school students identified as heterosexual, 2% identified as gay or lesbian, 6% identified as bisexual, and 3% were not sure of their sexual identity. Approximately 19% and 14% of heterosexual students had... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 4, 2016
    Young people run together

    This month, the world comes together to raise awareness for bullying prevention and to reflect on where we have been, where we are now, and where we hope to be in the years to come. This year’s Bullying Prevention Awareness Month marks the 10th anniversary of its initiation by PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center. Since 2006, the event has grown to an entire month of education and awareness activities, and is being recognized by schools and communities throughout the world.

    This month serves as a reminder that bullying prevention must be addressed,... Continue Reading

  • Posted: September 21, 2016
    National Academies Report Cover

    The recently released National Academies report, Preventing Bullying Through Science, Policy, and Practice (May 2016), presents a lot of actionable findings and recommendations. Our partners at the Children’s Safety Network (CSN) hosted a webinar series this summer, highlighting three major topic areas covered in the report: The Consequences of Bullying, Bullying Prevention Law and Policy and Preventative Interventions for Bullying. Each webinar featured bullying prevention experts who were co-authors of the report, and they shared their own insights and supporting research. The webinars have been archived for future viewing.

    The Consequences of Bullying 

    Dr... Continue Reading

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