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  • Posted: November 21, 2016

    All children deserve a chance—a chance to be safe, to be educated and to be themselves. Too often, this chance is denied to lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, questioning/queer, intersex, gender nonconforming (LGBTQI-GNC) and Two-Spirit* youth. Many of these youth are rejected by their families and bullied by their peers. The lack of familial and peer support can lead LGBTQI-GNC youth into the juvenile justice system, where they may also face abuse or harassment.

    The Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention (OJJDP) is the only federal agency focused solely on the needs of youth in the juvenile justice system—and that includes LGBTQI-GNC and Two-Spirit youth. We must acknowledge the challenges that this youth population faces every day and the opportunities that we all have to help them succeed.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 17, 2016

    Bullying is a big problem for many children and teens, and especially for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. 

    Data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) show that in the year before the survey:

    34% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were bullied on school property 28% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were electronically bullied, and 13% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students did not go to school because of safety concerns.

    While nationally representative data are not yet available based on gender identity, we know that transgender youth often suffer even higher levels of bullying and violence than their non-transgender peers.

    For all groups, bullying is linked to poor outcomes, including poor mental health, substance use, suicide, and academic problems. A... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 12, 2016
    Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sexual Identity, 2015, Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sex of Sexual Contact, 2015

    Every other year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) administers the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in high schools across the U.S. In the 2015 survey, two items were included to capture sexual orientation - self-reported sexual identity and the sex of sexual contacts. The results, found here, provide current national estimates of the percentage of high school students who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual or are not sure of their sexual identity and the percentage of high school students who have had sexual contact with only the same sex or with both sexes. In addition, the publication provides estimates of many health-related behaviors by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts.

    Nationwide, 89% of high school students identified as heterosexual, 2% identified as gay or lesbian, 6% identified as bisexual, and 3% were not sure of their sexual identity. Approximately 19% and 14% of heterosexual students had... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 6, 2016
    Syeda Raza

    For many students in America, bullying is a daily reality that contributes to them feeling stressed, unsafe, and distracted from learning. Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students, as well as Muslim, Arab, Sikh, and South Asian (MASSA) students, can be bullied based on their religion, appearance, immigration status, language skills, and more. In honor of National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, we are highlighting the voice of Syeda Raza, who recounts her experience growing up Muslim in America:

    Syeda Raza is currently a college student and E3... Continue Reading
    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: September 13, 2016

    Every day, kids of all ages experience bullying in schools across the country. In the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, this problem is often compounded by cultural, religious, and linguistic barriers that can make it harder for AAPI youth to seek and receive help. Anecdotal evidence has shown that certain AAPI groups – including South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, Micronesian, LGBT, immigrant, and limited English proficient youth – are more likely to be the targets of bullying. And in some areas, bullying of AAPI students can be shockingly common.

    To help address this problem, in November 2014, during the fifth anniversary of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, the federal government formed an interagency AAPI Bullying Prevention Task Force (AAPI Task Force). The AAPI Task Force strives to learn more about the experiences of AAPI students facing bullying and how the federal government can help. The AAPI... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: April 19, 2016
    woman speaking at podium

    School continues to be a dangerous place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth.   A 2014 study by the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) found that 65% of LGBT students heard homophobic remarks frequently or often, 56% of LGBT students reported personally experiencing LGBT-related discriminatory policies or practices at school, and 33% of LGBT students were physically harassed (e.g., pushed or shoved) in the past year because of their sexual orientation.

    “Despite increased public acceptance of LGBT people in general, many school campuses remain toxic environments for LGBT students, contributing to higher rates of suicide, depression, homelessness and HIV infection,” said Los Angeles LGBT Center CEO Lorri L. Jean.

    In 2013, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) in coordination with other community... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 29, 2015
    a girl stands apart from other teens

    At the National Suicide Prevention Lifeline , we believe it’s important to raise awareness about the effects of bullying. Together with our partners, we work to provide resources and support for those in emotional distress, including individuals who have been bullied.

    In popular media, bullying behavior is often linked to suicide in youth.  As a result, many in the community may believe that bullying is a direct cause of suicidal behavior in young people.  In fact, while bullying can be a factor in youth suicide, bullying alone... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 14, 2015
    Melissa Mercado headshot

    Longer ago than I like to admit, I was a Puerto Rican middle school student. I remember witnessing fellow Hispanic or Latino kids endure name calling and rumor spreading nearly every day over many years. I also recall hearing about other kids being beaten up or getting physically hurt because of bullying. Personally, I experienced bullying through social isolation — hearing after the fact from my  peers about how much fun they all had at that awesome birthday party, quinceañero (Sweet 15th), movie or beach outing to which I was not invited.

    Why were my friends and I targeted? Was it because we were Hispanic? Not at all. We were all Puerto Rican kids, growing up and attending school in Puerto Rico (a U.S. territory), and being bullied by kids of our same ethnicity.

    But we were seen as... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 5, 2015

    This month, across the world, from New York to New Zealand, thousands of schools, communities, organizations, and individuals will come together to release new resources, campaigns, and efforts aimed at raising awareness for bullying prevention. Nearly a decade old, Bullying Prevention Awareness month was initiated by PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center in October 2006. Since it began, the event has grown to an entire month of education and awareness activities, and is being recognized by schools and communities throughout the world. PACER recognized that students, parents, and people around the world need to become more aware of the... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: June 10, 2015
    Students walking with backpacks.

    The Yale Center for Emotional Intelligence in partnership with Born This Way Foundation (founded by Lady Gaga and her mother, Cynthia Germanotta) are launching a national campaign, the Emotion Revolution, to learn more about how high school students currently feel in school, how they hope to feel, and what is needed to bridge the gap. The goal is to push our nation’s education system toward creating the best possible learning environments through evidence-based social and emotional learning (SEL).

    The campaign is launching with an anonymous, nationwide survey of high school students developed by the Center’s research team. The immediate goal is to use the results to create an emotion climate map of the U.S. and to be able to see the similarities and differences across gender, ethnicity, and geographic location. A second goal is to use this information to encourage... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response

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