Text Size: A A A

Stopbullying Blog RSS Feed

Category Archives for Educators

  • Posted: November 29, 2016

    Schools across the U.S. frequently confront the issue of bullying among their student population. However, identifying the nature of a specific bullying problem (including its symptoms and causes) in a given school—and implementing solutions that work—is complicated. While research on evidence-based programs is helpful in guiding school personnel toward solutions that have been shown to work in the past, it sheds little light on how those programs or practices were implemented in schools or on the institutional processes, faculty and student body characteristics that made them work.

    The new School-based Bullying Prevention I-Guide (short for implementation Guide) from the Office of Juvenile Justice and Delinquency Prevention aims to fill that gap. The newest feature of OJJDP’s... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 27, 2016

    What is Cyberbullying?

    Cyberbullying is bullying that takes place using electronic technology. Electronic technology includes devices and equipment such as cell phones, computers, and tablets as well as communication tools including social media sites, text messages, chat, and websites. Cyberbullying is similar to traditional bullying in many ways; however, the main difference from traditional bullying, is that it doesn’t stop when the child is in the safety of his/her own home. A child who is cyberbullied is likely to be bullied at school as well. Cyberbullying can be relentless, prohibiting an escape for the victim, which can severely damage a child’s mental health and negatively affect self-esteem.

     When a child is bullied at school or on the playground, he knows who his bully is.  The “anonymity” associated with cyberbullying often leaves the victim feeling like he/she has no... Continue Reading

    Posted in Cyberbullying
  • Posted: October 17, 2016

    Bullying is a big problem for many children and teens, and especially for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. 

    Data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) show that in the year before the survey:

    34% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were bullied on school property 28% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were electronically bullied, and 13% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students did not go to school because of safety concerns.

    While nationally representative data are not yet available based on gender identity, we know that transgender youth often suffer even higher levels of bullying and violence than their non-transgender peers.

    For all groups, bullying is linked to poor outcomes, including poor mental health, substance use, suicide, and academic problems. A... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 12, 2016
    Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sexual Identity, 2015, Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sex of Sexual Contact, 2015

    Every other year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) administers the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in high schools across the U.S. In the 2015 survey, two items were included to capture sexual orientation - self-reported sexual identity and the sex of sexual contacts. The results, found here, provide current national estimates of the percentage of high school students who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual or are not sure of their sexual identity and the percentage of high school students who have had sexual contact with only the same sex or with both sexes. In addition, the publication provides estimates of many health-related behaviors by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts.

    Nationwide, 89% of high school students identified as heterosexual, 2% identified as gay or lesbian, 6% identified as bisexual, and 3% were not sure of their sexual identity. Approximately 19% and 14% of heterosexual students had... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: September 27, 2016
    Jim Macrae, HRSA Acting Administrator, speaking during the Summit

    On Friday, Aug. 12, 2016, the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention hosted the fifth Federal Bullying Prevention Summit at the U.S. Department of Education. Conducted every two years, this year’s theme was “Keeping Kids Safe: Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion Among Students to Prevent Bullying.”

     

    ... Continue Reading

  • Posted: September 13, 2016

    Every day, kids of all ages experience bullying in schools across the country. In the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, this problem is often compounded by cultural, religious, and linguistic barriers that can make it harder for AAPI youth to seek and receive help. Anecdotal evidence has shown that certain AAPI groups – including South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, Micronesian, LGBT, immigrant, and limited English proficient youth – are more likely to be the targets of bullying. And in some areas, bullying of AAPI students can be shockingly common.

    To help address this problem, in November 2014, during the fifth anniversary of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, the federal government formed an interagency AAPI Bullying Prevention Task Force (AAPI Task Force). The AAPI Task Force strives to learn more about the experiences of AAPI students facing bullying and how the federal government can help. The AAPI... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: May 10, 2016

    Community policing is a philosophy revolving around the concept of law enforcement and the community working together to ensure public safety for all in the community. By engaging in partnerships, problem solving, and organizational change, a law enforcement agency can approach public safety in a comprehensive, proactive method. Community policing is neither a program nor a single policing unit, however, it is a philosophy that involves all within the agency and the community.

    Community policing can be applied to any setting, including schools. By following community policing, school resource officers (SROs) and school safety personnel can contribute to a productive and enriching environment for students, teachers, and administrators alike. SROs are able to be a strong role model for students all while providing positive interactions between youth and law enforcement.

    For some students, the SRO provides them an opportunity to interact with law enforcement in a non-confrontational and positive manner. It is important that schools and law enforcement agencies enter... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: April 19, 2016
    woman speaking at podium

    School continues to be a dangerous place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth.   A 2014 study by the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) found that 65% of LGBT students heard homophobic remarks frequently or often, 56% of LGBT students reported personally experiencing LGBT-related discriminatory policies or practices at school, and 33% of LGBT students were physically harassed (e.g., pushed or shoved) in the past year because of their sexual orientation.

    “Despite increased public acceptance of LGBT people in general, many school campuses remain toxic environments for LGBT students, contributing to higher rates of suicide, depression, homelessness and HIV infection,” said Los Angeles LGBT Center CEO Lorri L. Jean.

    In 2013, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) in coordination with other community... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: March 30, 2016
    mother with arm around daughter

    Through our work with communities across the country, we know stakeholders from health and education sectors are eager to prevent youth bullying. Yet, they may not know where to get the right information to start and sustain impactful local efforts. This is why the Health Resources Services Administration (HRSA) worked with the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) to create a new Bullying Prevention Online Course, which will provide the tools needed to help make a difference in communities across the U.S. This course presents the latest knowledge and best practices from the field of bullying prevention. 

    This course is a FREE professional development tool for everyone who wants to be engaged in bullying... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: March 2, 2016

    States and districts are increasingly in support of policies and practices that shift school discipline away from zero tolerance, such as suspension and expulsion, to discipline that is focused on teaching and engagement. To this effort, districts and states are rethinking discipline and adopting both Restorative Justice Practices (RJP) and Bullying Prevention (BP) as school-wide efforts to provide school staff with a set of preventative and responsive strategies to supporting positive student behaviors. Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention

Pages

Subscribe to