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  • Posted: October 25, 2016

    For the Navajo people, the concept of K’e, or kinship, is one of the most fundamental lessons taught to every child. This begins with the child learning their four inherited clans, which connects them to extended families within the tribal nation. The child is then taught what to call those with whom they share a clan—strangers may acquire titles such as mother or brother through this system—, and the specific set of mutual responsibilities that accompany these terms. To demonstrate the importance of having a positive, inclusive community during National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, StopBullying.Gov is honored to share the experiences of Sam Slater, a member of the Navajo Nation.

    “Growing up, this was the most powerful anti-bullying tool in my belt. K’e demonstrated for me how to treat everyone like a relative. This meant understanding my role in helping and learning from other people. We raise one another up and value the individuality of our collective voice, further extending these teachings into a compassionate community and beyond.

    “... Continue Reading

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  • Posted: October 17, 2016

    Bullying is a big problem for many children and teens, and especially for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender students. 

    Data from the 2015 national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) show that in the year before the survey:

    34% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were bullied on school property 28% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students were electronically bullied, and 13% of lesbian, gay and bisexual students did not go to school because of safety concerns.

    While nationally representative data are not yet available based on gender identity, we know that transgender youth often suffer even higher levels of bullying and violence than their non-transgender peers.

    For all groups, bullying is linked to poor outcomes, including poor mental health, substance use, suicide, and academic problems. A... Continue Reading

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  • Posted: October 12, 2016
    Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sexual Identity, 2015, Percentage of High School Students Who Experienced Bullying, by Sex of Sexual Contact, 2015

    Every other year, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) administers the national Youth Risk Behavior Survey (YRBS) in high schools across the U.S. In the 2015 survey, two items were included to capture sexual orientation - self-reported sexual identity and the sex of sexual contacts. The results, found here, provide current national estimates of the percentage of high school students who are gay, lesbian, and bisexual or are not sure of their sexual identity and the percentage of high school students who have had sexual contact with only the same sex or with both sexes. In addition, the publication provides estimates of many health-related behaviors by sexual identity and sex of sexual contacts.

    Nationwide, 89% of high school students identified as heterosexual, 2% identified as gay or lesbian, 6% identified as bisexual, and 3% were not sure of their sexual identity. Approximately 19% and 14% of heterosexual students had... Continue Reading

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  • Posted: October 6, 2016
    Syeda Raza

    For many students in America, bullying is a daily reality that contributes to them feeling stressed, unsafe, and distracted from learning. Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) students, as well as Muslim, Arab, Sikh, and South Asian (MASSA) students, can be bullied based on their religion, appearance, immigration status, language skills, and more. In honor of National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month, we are highlighting the voice of Syeda Raza, who recounts her experience growing up Muslim in America:

    Syeda Raza is currently a college student and E3... Continue Reading
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  • Posted: October 4, 2016
    Young people run together

    This month, the world comes together to raise awareness for bullying prevention and to reflect on where we have been, where we are now, and where we hope to be in the years to come. This year’s Bullying Prevention Awareness Month marks the 10th anniversary of its initiation by PACER's National Bullying Prevention Center. Since 2006, the event has grown to an entire month of education and awareness activities, and is being recognized by schools and communities throughout the world.

    This month serves as a reminder that bullying prevention must be addressed,... Continue Reading

  • Posted: September 27, 2016
    Jim Macrae, HRSA Acting Administrator, speaking during the Summit

    On Friday, Aug. 12, 2016, the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention hosted the fifth Federal Bullying Prevention Summit at the U.S. Department of Education. Conducted every two years, this year’s theme was “Keeping Kids Safe: Promoting Tolerance and Inclusion Among Students to Prevent Bullying.”


    ... Continue Reading

  • Posted: September 13, 2016

    Every day, kids of all ages experience bullying in schools across the country. In the Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) community, this problem is often compounded by cultural, religious, and linguistic barriers that can make it harder for AAPI youth to seek and receive help. Anecdotal evidence has shown that certain AAPI groups – including South Asian, Muslim, Sikh, Micronesian, LGBT, immigrant, and limited English proficient youth – are more likely to be the targets of bullying. And in some areas, bullying of AAPI students can be shockingly common.

    To help address this problem, in November 2014, during the fifth anniversary of the Matthew Shepard and James Byrd Jr. Hate Crimes Prevention Act, the federal government formed an interagency AAPI Bullying Prevention Task Force (AAPI Task Force). The AAPI Task Force strives to learn more about the experiences of AAPI students facing bullying and how the federal government can help. The AAPI... Continue Reading

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  • Posted: June 29, 2016

    By the time Landon – a high school student in Massachusetts – entered his freshman year, he had already been in and out of the hospital for multiple suicide attempts. He had been pulled out of school because he wasn’t able to get through the day, and he needed medication to sleep.

    Today, Landon is back in school – a vocational school he transferred to as a sophomore, after coming out to friends and family as a transgender boy – and things have gotten a little easier for him. Landon’s new school is committed to treating every student with dignity and respect, and together they have found ways to allow Landon to survive and thrive in his new surroundings. But getting there has taken time, and the path hasn’t always been clear.

    In recent months, we’ve heard from a growing chorus of educators, parents, and students around the country about the need for guidance on how schools can successfully support transgender students and non-transgender students in compliance with federal civil rights laws. In fact, just this week, the National Association of Secondary School... Continue Reading

  • Posted: April 19, 2016
    woman speaking at podium

    School continues to be a dangerous place for lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgender (LGBT) youth.   A 2014 study by the Gay, Lesbian & Straight Education Network (GLSEN) found that 65% of LGBT students heard homophobic remarks frequently or often, 56% of LGBT students reported personally experiencing LGBT-related discriminatory policies or practices at school, and 33% of LGBT students were physically harassed (e.g., pushed or shoved) in the past year because of their sexual orientation.

    “Despite increased public acceptance of LGBT people in general, many school campuses remain toxic environments for LGBT students, contributing to higher rates of suicide, depression, homelessness and HIV infection,” said Los Angeles LGBT Center CEO Lorri L. Jean.

    In 2013, the Los Angeles LGBT Center and Los Angeles Unified School District (LAUSD) in coordination with other community... Continue Reading

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  • Posted: February 9, 2016
    children holding hands

    Not since the days and months immediately after September 11 has the Muslim community faced the level of anti-Muslim bias and bullying that has been seen over the past several months. In the wake of Paris and other terrorist attacks, combined with the emergence of the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria (ISIS), a lack of information among the public about Islam, and the tendency to associate  Islam with terrorism, there has been an increase in expressions and incidents
    targeting the Muslim community and those who are perceived to be Muslim, such as members of the Sikh community. There has also been an increased wave of anti-Muslim sentiment in our public discourse, political rhetoric and everyday interactions.  Schools have not been immune. Youth have been called, “terrorists” or “ISIS.” There have been... Continue Reading

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