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Category Archives for Youth with Disabilities

  • Posted: February 19, 2014

    Last weekend, the Human Rights Campaign, in partnership with the National Education Association and American Counseling Association, hosted the first-ever “Time to Thrive” conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The conference brought together hundreds of educators, school administrators, coaches, social workers, mental health providers, and other youth development staff for a conversation about promoting safety, inclusion, and well-being among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth.

    Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have taken significant steps to advance equality for the LGBT community – including addressing and preventing bullying and harassment of LGBT young people in classrooms and communities around the country. That’s why I was proud to moderate a panel discussion with colleagues from the Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Agriculture to highlight some of the bullying prevention and youth empowerment resources available across the federal government. Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 23, 2013
    Why We Don’t Use the Word “Bully” to Label Kids

    “That kid is a bully.”

    We have all heard someone utter these words at one time or another, but is it fair to label a child?

    The labels bully, victim, and target are used often by media, researchers and others to refer to children who bully others and children who are bullied.  Yet, you won’t find these terms used in this way on StopBullying.gov. For... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: August 23, 2013
    A teacher talks to her class.

    As Secretary Duncan has noted, the Department of Education is committed to making sure that all of our young people grow up free of fear, violence, and bullying. Bullying not only threatens a student’s physical and emotional safety at school, but fosters a climate of fear and disrespect, creating conditions that negatively impact learning—undermining students’ ability to achieve to their full potential. Unfortunately, we know that children with disabilities are disproportionately affected by bullying.

    Factors such as physical vulnerability, social skills challenges, or intolerant environments may increase the risk of bullying. Students who are targets of bullying are more likely to experience lower academic achievement, higher truancy rates, feelings of alienation, poor peer relationships, loneliness, and depression. We must do... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: February 21, 2013

    Bullying can happen anywhere. It can happen in person, online, or behind your back. But there are some groups that are at higher risk.

    Erin Reiney is the Director of Injury and Violence Prevention at the Health Resources and Service’s Administration (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). She leads HRSA’s Bullying Prevention efforts, and serves as project officer for the MCHB Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Resource Center Consortium and the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: August 22, 2012

    Bullying can happen anywhere—cities, suburbs, or rural towns. Depending on the environment, some groups—such as lesbian, gay, bisexual, or transgendered (LGBT) youth, youth with disabilities, and socially isolated youth—may be at an increased risk of being bullied. Ingrid Donato is at the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration and is Chief of the Mental Health Promotion Branch within the Center for Mental Health Services. Ingrid oversees programs aimed at preventing mental, emotional, and behavioral disorders in youth and young adults, including addressing issues such as youth violence, bullying prevention, and early childhood development, as well as screening, systems integration, and access to care.

    Recognizing the warning signs is an important first step in taking action against bullying. Not all children who are bullied or are... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
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