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  • Posted: May 1, 2014
    Youth participate in an bullying prevention activity.

    The United National Indian Tribal Youth (UNITY) organization was an early partner in federal efforts to stop bullying. For the past 37 years, our goal has been to foster the spiritual, mental, physical, and social development of American Indian and Alaska Native youth and to help build a strong, unified, and self- reliant Native America through greater youth involvement. Since 2002, we have been working with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to help educate American Indian youth on bullying prevention and provide them with the tools to be more than a bystander.

    We’ve seen the need for prevention efforts evolve over the past several years, specifically in relation to the mascot issue, as many schools and sports teams may accept native names that are actually considered offensive. Our Youth Councils recognized that bullying was a... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: April 3, 2014
    School students raise Stop Bullying: Speak Up flag at their school.

    Understanding what excites and concerns youth is one of the critical ingredients to Cartoon Network’s success. That’s why we knew we had to act when we learned that nearly 85 percent of our youth audience was concerned about bullying and needed information on how to prevent it.

    When we first launched Stop Bullying: Speak Up, we saw a great opportunity to make kids smarter about bullying and to also strengthen our connection with kids and families. Our goal was to develop an awareness campaign designed to provide resources for parents, kids and educators and explain in simple terms, the variety of ways people can take action to resolve the bullying issue and prevent it from happening. But like many things in business,... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: March 4, 2014
     A girl and her mother visit a counselor.

    In my 27 years as a school psychologist, I have seen an increase in how many students and families are concerned about bullying. I have witnessed first-hand the damage it can cause –not only to the children being bullied, but also to those who witness bullying, and even to kids who bully.  Thankfully, I have also seen this issue go beyond what many used to think of as an acceptable “rite of passage,” to one that is seen for what it actually is: an important public health issue that merits community prevention and response.

    ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: February 24, 2014
    A multi-cultural adoptive family

    It is the rare adopted child who has not received questions and comments about adoption. They come from people who know them or from complete strangers:

    “Do you know anything about your ‘real’ parents?” “Why were you adopted?” “Do you want to find your ‘real’ parents?” or “How come you don’t look like your parents?”   

    Some people ask adopted kids questions because they are being friendly or curious. Most are unaware of the embarrassment and pain their questions or comments may cause. Other kids may intentionally attempt to tease or bully an adopted youth. Their comments can be painful. These questions often go right to the heart of adoptees’ self-concept and self-esteem, challenging who they are and where they belong.  This may mirror the exact questions that adopted children may be pondering... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: February 19, 2014

    Last weekend, the Human Rights Campaign, in partnership with the National Education Association and American Counseling Association, hosted the first-ever “Time to Thrive” conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The conference brought together hundreds of educators, school administrators, coaches, social workers, mental health providers, and other youth development staff for a conversation about promoting safety, inclusion, and well-being among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth.

    Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have taken significant steps to advance equality for the LGBT community – including addressing and preventing bullying and harassment of LGBT young people in classrooms and communities around the country. That’s why I was proud to moderate a panel discussion with colleagues from the Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Agriculture to highlight some of the bullying prevention and youth empowerment resources available across the federal government. Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: February 10, 2014
    Bullying Surveillance Among Youth journal

    In order to stop bullying before it begins, it is necessary to improve the consistency and comparability of data on bullying. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC), the Department of Education (ED), and the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) partnered with bullying experts to develop a uniform definition of bullying for research and surveillance. In January 2014, CDC and ED released the definition listed below:

    Bullying is any unwanted aggressive behavior(s) by another youth or group of youths who are not siblings or current dating partners that involves an observed or perceived power imbalance and is repeated multiple times or is highly likely to be... Continue Reading
  • Posted: January 7, 2014

    The conversations we’ve had with community members across the country have taught us that training tools are among the most sought-after resources for promoting bullying prevention research and best practices.

    Guided by feedback from community members, the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) created the resources that would empower even more individuals to address bullying in the community. In partnership with the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention, HRSA unveiled free Training Module Resources last year, to help local leaders organize an event or town hall on bullying.

    Around the same time, the Department of Education launched a pair of Safe and Supportive Schools trainings to promote best practices in bullying intervention among... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: December 30, 2013
    Sad teen boy is seated with a backpack.

    In the past decade, headlines reporting the tragic stories of a young person’s suicide death linked in some way to bullying have become regrettably common. There is so much pain and suffering associated with each of these events, affecting individuals, families, communities and our society as a whole. There is an increasing national outcry to “do something” about the problem of bullying and suicide.

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) and other violence prevention partners are conducting research to learn more about the relationship between these two serious public health problems with the goal of using what we have learned to save lives and prevent future suffering. One example of this work is in September 2010, the CDC brought together a panel of experts who presented research focusing on this... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: November 6, 2013
    Group of teens hanging out.

    The Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention, a group of representatives from across the federal government came up with a great way of having youth and adults partner to hold a dynamic bullying prevention initiative. Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 29, 2013
    Person typing on a computer

    In the world of social media and online networking, the issue of safety continuously arises, particularly among teenagers.  Cyberbullying, bullying that takes place using electronic technology, has unique challenges when compared to more traditional forms of bullying.

    Parents need to be aware of what their teens are doing online and talk with them about cyberbullying and other online issues regularly.  Initiate open conversation early on to reduce the teen’s fear of losing their electronic communication privileges when they disclose cyberbullying instances.

    When using a site such as Facebook, parents need to discuss how their teen uses the site and with whom they share their posts. Is the teen communicating privately or publicly... Continue Reading

    Posted in Cyberbullying

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