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  • Posted: August 18, 2014
    Know Bullying App from SAMHSA

    Parents and caregivers are a child’s first and best teacher. Your child is listening and remembering your advice, even when it seems like he/she is not paying attention. In fact, spending 15 minutes a day listening and talking with your child can help build the foundation for a strong relationship and provide reassurance that he/she can come to you with a problem. It can also help your child recognize and respond to bullying.

    So, what will you say? KnowBullying, a new mobile app by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), can help get the conversation started. The app provides tips on talking about school, work, relationships, life, and bullying. You can help prevent bullying and increase communication with your child while making dinner, shopping, or anytime you and your child have 15 minutes together. The app also... Continue Reading

  • Posted: August 6, 2014
    Teen panelists speak during IOM workshop.

    On April 9-10, 2014, practitioners, researchers, students, educators, and community members came together at the National Academy of Sciences in Washington, D.C., to discuss research on bullying and interventions, laws and public policies to prevent and address it. Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: June 30, 2014
    Girl swimming in public pool.

    Natasha Herring, a manager with D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), recently got involved with StopBullying.gov when she identified a unique need to address bullying in her local parks and facilities. The post below reflects her story on how D.C. Parks and Recreation is taking action to prevent bullying. Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: June 19, 2014
    Pride! Learn How to Reach Out to LGBT Youth

    The White House has declared June as LGBT Pride Month.  During this month many organizations are focused on raising awareness about issues, and will celebrate the progress made towards increasing equal rights for those who identify themselves with the LGBT community.  President Barack Obama has made efforts towards improving gay rights such as in employment.  In the United States, people are still being fired from their jobs for their sexual orientation.  President Obama continues to work with Congress to pass the Employment Non-Discrimination Act, so that injustices like this are stopped.

    LGBT awareness has led school districts to adopt policies that protect LGBT students. This includes inclusive anti-bullying policies. According to one study (Kosciw, Greytak, Diaz, & Bartkiewicz, 2010) 84% of LGBT students report being bullied in school.  In addition... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: June 5, 2014
    LGBT Hand

    The mission of Outright Vermont is to build safe, healthy, and supportive environments for LGBTQQ (Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual, Transgender, Queer, and Questioning) youth, ages 13-22. Since 1989, Outright has worked to provide safety and support for LGBTQQ youth, helped make schools more inclusive, and focused on youth empowerment, leadership, and advocacy.  Outright works with nearly 5,000 youth annually, is the oldest LGBTQQ youth serving organization in the state of Vermont, and is one of the few remaining free-standing LGBTQQ youth centers nationwide.

    Outright does a lot of work in Vermont’s schools. We travel around the state, educating teachers, staff, and students at elementary schools, middle schools, high schools, and colleges. We offer a variety of presentations, including Ally Development for Adults Working with LGBTQQ Youth, Anti-Harassment Training, LGBTQQ 101, and Trans* 101. This year,... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: May 1, 2014
    Youth participate in an bullying prevention activity.

    The United National Indian Tribal Youth (UNITY) organization was an early partner in federal efforts to stop bullying. For the past 37 years, our goal has been to foster the spiritual, mental, physical, and social development of American Indian and Alaska Native youth and to help build a strong, unified, and self- reliant Native America through greater youth involvement. Since 2002, we have been working with the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) to help educate American Indian youth on bullying prevention and provide them with the tools to be more than a bystander.

    We’ve seen the need for prevention efforts evolve over the past several years, specifically in relation to the mascot issue, as many schools and sports teams may accept native names that are actually considered offensive. Our Youth Councils recognized that bullying was a... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: April 3, 2014
    School students raise Stop Bullying: Speak Up flag at their school.

    Understanding what excites and concerns youth is one of the critical ingredients to Cartoon Network’s success. That’s why we knew we had to act when we learned that nearly 85 percent of our youth audience was concerned about bullying and needed information on how to prevent it.

    When we first launched Stop Bullying: Speak Up, we saw a great opportunity to make kids smarter about bullying and to also strengthen our connection with kids and families. Our goal was to develop an awareness campaign designed to provide resources for parents, kids and educators and explain in simple terms, the variety of ways people can take action to resolve the bullying issue and prevent it from happening. But like many things in business,... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: March 4, 2014
     A girl and her mother visit a counselor.

    In my 27 years as a school psychologist, I have seen an increase in how many students and families are concerned about bullying. I have witnessed first-hand the damage it can cause –not only to the children being bullied, but also to those who witness bullying, and even to kids who bully.  Thankfully, I have also seen this issue go beyond what many used to think of as an acceptable “rite of passage,” to one that is seen for what it actually is: an important public health issue that merits community prevention and response.

    ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: February 24, 2014
    A multi-cultural adoptive family

    It is the rare adopted child who has not received questions and comments about adoption. They come from people who know them or from complete strangers:

    “Do you know anything about your ‘real’ parents?” “Why were you adopted?” “Do you want to find your ‘real’ parents?” or “How come you don’t look like your parents?”   

    Some people ask adopted kids questions because they are being friendly or curious. Most are unaware of the embarrassment and pain their questions or comments may cause. Other kids may intentionally attempt to tease or bully an adopted youth. Their comments can be painful. These questions often go right to the heart of adoptees’ self-concept and self-esteem, challenging who they are and where they belong.  This may mirror the exact questions that adopted children may be pondering... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: February 19, 2014

    Last weekend, the Human Rights Campaign, in partnership with the National Education Association and American Counseling Association, hosted the first-ever “Time to Thrive” conference in Las Vegas, Nevada. The conference brought together hundreds of educators, school administrators, coaches, social workers, mental health providers, and other youth development staff for a conversation about promoting safety, inclusion, and well-being among lesbian, gay, bisexual, transgender, and questioning (LGBTQ) youth.

    Since taking office, President Obama and his Administration have taken significant steps to advance equality for the LGBT community – including addressing and preventing bullying and harassment of LGBT young people in classrooms and communities around the country. That’s why I was proud to moderate a panel discussion with colleagues from the Departments of Education, Health and Human Services, and Agriculture to highlight some of the bullying prevention and youth empowerment resources available across the federal government. Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups

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