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  • Posted: October 23, 2013
    Why We Don’t Use the Word “Bully” to Label Kids

    “That kid is a bully.”

    We have all heard someone utter these words at one time or another, but is it fair to label a child?

    The labels bully, victim, and target are used often by media, researchers and others to refer to children who bully others and children who are bullied.  Yet, you won’t find these terms used in this way on StopBullying.gov. For... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: July 1, 2013

    Although bullying can occur among individuals of any weight, overweight and underweight children tend to be at higher risk for bullying. Targets of verbal bullying based on weight, sometimes referred to as “weight teasing,” can experience a number of negative consequences, including a change in body perception.

    Weight teasing by both family and peers has been associated with high levels of anxiety and low self-esteem among adolescents. Having low self-esteem because of peer criticism can change an individual’s body image. Body image is the positive or negative feelings you have about the way you look. Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: June 3, 2013
    An isolated teenager walks alone.

    Duke University professors recently published research that shows the degree to which bullying can affect someone’s mental health.

    Authors Copeland, Wolke, Angold, and Costello discovered that victims of childhood bullying have a higher risk of developing mental health problems later in life. The study followed more than 1,000 youth, starting at the ages of 9, 11, and 13. The youth were interviewed each year until they turned 16. Follow-up interviews were then conducted into adulthood.

    ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: May 14, 2013
    Several men stand together.

    The issue of bullying is a growing concern in schools across the United States. A lot of research attention has been given to the overlap between bullying and other forms of youth violence, including gang related, as well as behavioral health risks, such as substance use. Bullying can be a big issue for schools since it not only creates a poor school environment for students but also impacts school staff. Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: April 9, 2013
    Friends hang out and eat pizza.

    Bullying stops teens from being who they want to be, prevents them from expressing themselves freely, and might even make them feel unsafe. Bullying can happen anywhere, both in person and online. In this age of constant connectivity, and understanding the value teens place on their social networks, it’s only fitting to try and better reach them digitally.

    It’s no surprise that teens are highly visual, socially oriented, and always “connected.” They’re constantly on their phones and social networks sharing photos, providing encouragement to their friends, and communicating in a variety of ways. We saw this as an area where StopBullying.gov could grow and help reach teens where they are.

    We are excited to announce the launch of our new Tumblr page... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: March 19, 2013
    A group of teens harrass a young woman.

    Most experts acknowledge that bullying is a serious problem that has negative consequences for both perpetrators and victims. However, we know very little about how bullying early in life affects future behaviors.

    Several years ago, the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention began a partnership with researchers at the University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign to better understand how bullying may lead to sexual violence. When we say “sexual violence,” we are talking about one specific type, sexual harassment, which does not include forcible acts like rape. Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: February 27, 2013
    Research books

    Recent media publicity around suicides by youth who were bullied by their peers has led many to assume that bullying often leads directly to suicide. Although youth who are involved in bullying are more likely to have suicidal thoughts and attempt suicide than those who are not involved in bullying, research indicates that other risk factors play a larger role in suicidal behavior.

    What do we know about suicide and its causes? Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: January 29, 2013
    Teens drinking alcohol

    On the surface, bullying and youth substance use may seem like separate problems. However, from research, we know that kids who use drugs or alcohol are at risk for other problem behaviors during their teen years. Recent findings confirm previous studies that found links between bullying and substance use. In a recent article, researchers found that middle and high school students who bully their peers or are bully-victims (bully others and are also bullied) are more likely than students who aren’t involved in bullying to use alcohol, cigarettes, and marijuana. Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: December 20, 2012

    Our recent Stop Bullying Video Challenge and our ongoing Ad Council “Be More than a Bystander” campaign are helping to promote the message that it is up to all of us to stand up against bullying, even if we are not personally involved.

    Newly published research in Children and Youth Services Review shows just how important being the one who stands up is in encouraging... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 30, 2012
    A pair of glasses rest on a research book in front of man on a computer

    From a very early age, we pick up on important social cues that benefit us throughout school, and even into our working lives. These cues include standing at an appropriate distance, not touching the person in front of you, and even using the right volume when speaking. These basic skills are essential for functioning socially. Children with autism often do not pick up on the same cues as other children can, which can make them vulnerable to bullying.

    Recently, children with autism have caught national attention because of the bullying that happens to them. A 2012 study ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors

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