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Category Archives for Research

  • Posted: September 10, 2015
    line graph depicting aggression levels for students grades 6 through 12

    Bullying can take many forms: hitting or pushing (physical bullying), teasing or calling others bad names (verbal bullying).  And it also involves relational forms, such as manipulating peer relationships by spreading nasty rumors, threatening to terminate friendships or excluding someone from a social group.  Students who are bullied in any of these ways may suffer from depression and anxiety, and have academic problems.  

    In the past two decades, relational aggression has received an abundance of media attention.  Books, movies and websites have portrayed girls as being cruel to one another, thus creating and reinforcing the stereotype of “mean girls.” However, this popular perception of girls being meaner than boys is not always supported by research. While data from the U.S. Department of Education shows some differences between how boys and girls experience bullying – for example, girls were more... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: August 6, 2015
    Adult and children coloring with crayons

    The earlier we start, the better the outcomes. Brain scientists, educators, economists and public health experts agree that the foundation for healthy relationships begins at birth. The earlier children can adapt and develop critical social-emotional skills – like attentiveness, persistence and impulse control – the earlier they can engage in healthy social interactions with their peers.

    Given the tremendous amount of social and cognitive development that occurs from birth through age 5, it is no wonder there is a growing body of research which shows that even very young children can be at risk for bullying. Before characterizing situations among young children as “bullying,” however, it is especially critical to recognize that... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: July 22, 2015
    doctor listening to child’s hearth with stethoscope

    As a pediatric emergency medicine physician for more than 20 years, seeing sick and injured kids in and out of your emergency department can be difficult, but a part of the job. Knowing you can help them, and being able to make them feel better is why we do what we do. Sadly, many of the children I was seeing with preventable injuries from fighting or assaults were a result of bullying or retaliatory behaviors. I needed to know what I could do to help, to turn the tide – and I have spent the last 10 years of my career focused on this issue. However, bullying still remains a bit of a mystery to many medical professionals.

    In April of 2014, I presented at the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and National Research Council (NRC) working session, “... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
    Tagged Health, Help, Research
  • Posted: June 24, 2015
    Teen girl comforting friend

    Bullying is more than a problem of one child bullying another. The power imbalance that defines bullying is also reflected in classroom social relations. Whereas those who bully are frequently considered “cool” or popular, their targets are “uncool” are typically rejected by classmates.

    Those who witness bullying play a key role in reinforcing and maintaining the social imbalance. Although in studies ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: May 15, 2015

    Bullying remains a serious issue for students and their families, and efforts to reduce bullying concern policy makers, administrators, and educators. According to U.S. Secretary of Education Arne Duncan, “As schools become safer, students are better able to thrive academically and socially. The Department, along with our federal partners and others, has been deeply involved in the fight against bullying in our nation’s schools.” This is why we are so pleased to share that, after remaining virtually unchanged for close to a decade, new data indicate that the prevalence of bullying is at a record low.

    According to the U.S. Department of Education’s National Center for Education Statistics latest School Crime Supplement (SCS) to the National Crime Victimization Survey, in 2013, the reported prevalence of bullying among students ages 12 to 18 dropped to 22 percent after remaining stubbornly around 28 percent since 2005.

    “The report brings welcome news,” U.S. Department of... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: May 12, 2015
    girl sitting alone on bench

    It was time for everyone in my 6th grade class to line up in the school gym for our annual weight/height measurements by the school nurse. My stomach was already churning, because, if past experiences taught me anything, I would need to brace for the bullying that would ensue after my weight was called out within earshot of my classmates.

    Sure enough, after my weight was announced, I heard laughing and whispers. In both the halls and classrooms, I was called names like “whale,” “heavy chevy” (a shortened version of my name), and “cow.”  Even my best friends called me names while we played together on the playground.

    That happened almost 40 years ago, but I can remember it plain as day, as if the words were permanently seared into my skin as reminders.

    I can also remember choking back tears all the way home and slinking upstairs to my room. I locked the door behind me and pried up a... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: April 21, 2015
    Sad girl in classroom

    Bullying is defined as unwanted, aggressive behavior among school-aged children that involves a real or perceived power imbalance. The behavior is repeated, or has the potential to be repeated, over time. Studies suggest that this type of peer victimization is a pervasive issue — 28% of children and youth reported being bullied at school during the 2011 school year. Research since the 1990s shows that children who are bullied are more likely than their peers to develop mental and physical health problems. Now, new neurobiological research... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: October 22, 2014
    Bullying hurts.

    Alongside communities across the country , the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is promoting Bullying Prevention Awareness Month.  This important observance is held every October.

    In 2004, HRSA launched the first Federal anti-bullying campaign to raise awareness about this very serious issue. Ten years later the... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 8, 2014
    Book Title: Building Capacity to Reduce Bullying - Workshop Summary

    Every October, communities around the country participate in National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month. This year, a new resource from the Institute of Medicine (IOM) and the National Research Council (NRC) is available to support awareness month activities.  Building Capacity to Reduce Bullying is a new report summarizing a two-day workshop that was held on April 9-10, 2014.  The workshop was sponsored by the Health Resources and Service Administration and examined ways to prevent bullying.  Over 20 experts shared research to... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: September 30, 2014
    Young boy holds a sign announcing "October is Bullying Prevention Awareness Month."

    October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month and it’s a good time for schools (including personnel and students), communities, districts, and states to take stock of current efforts to reduce and prevent bullying. Do current school climates make students feel safe, allowing them to thrive academically and socially? Are youth comfortable speaking up if they are being bullied? Are members of the community engaged and are the media aware of best practices when it comes to reporting bullying stories?

    In recognition of the efforts to improve school climate and reduce rates of bullying nationwide, the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention (FPBP) are proud to release a variety of resources aimed at informing youth, those who work with youth, members of the media, parents, and schools. These resources and more... Continue Reading


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