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  • Posted: February 24, 2014
    A multi-cultural adoptive family

    It is the rare adopted child who has not received questions and comments about adoption. They come from people who know them or from complete strangers:

    “Do you know anything about your ‘real’ parents?” “Why were you adopted?” “Do you want to find your ‘real’ parents?” or “How come you don’t look like your parents?”   

    Some people ask adopted kids questions because they are being friendly or curious. Most are unaware of the embarrassment and pain their questions or comments may cause. Other kids may intentionally attempt to tease or bully an adopted youth. Their comments can be painful. These questions often go right to the heart of adoptees’ self-concept and self-esteem, challenging who they are and where they belong.  This may mirror the exact questions that adopted children may be pondering... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 29, 2013
    Person typing on a computer

    In the world of social media and online networking, the issue of safety continuously arises, particularly among teenagers.  Cyberbullying, bullying that takes place using electronic technology, has unique challenges when compared to more traditional forms of bullying.

    Parents need to be aware of what their teens are doing online and talk with them about cyberbullying and other online issues regularly.  Initiate open conversation early on to reduce the teen’s fear of losing their electronic communication privileges when they disclose cyberbullying instances.

    When using a site such as Facebook, parents need to discuss how their teen uses the site and with whom they share their posts. Is the teen communicating privately or publicly... Continue Reading

    Posted in Cyberbullying
  • Posted: October 23, 2013
    Why We Don’t Use the Word “Bully” to Label Kids

    “That kid is a bully.”

    We have all heard someone utter these words at one time or another, but is it fair to label a child?

    The labels bully, victim, and target are used often by media, researchers and others to refer to children who bully others and children who are bullied.  Yet, you won’t find these terms used in this way on StopBullying.gov. For... Continue Reading

    Posted in Response
  • Posted: July 30, 2013
    Kids at play

    Its summertime! School’s out and there is a good chance that your kids will be spending some time at summer camp.  Whether its sports camp, adventure camp, music camp, or any of the other amazing arrays of camps available to kids these days, most camps are equipped to understand and address bullying.  As parents and caretakers, here are some tips to help have a conversation with your child and with camp staff if you suspect bullying may be taking place.

    Find out about camp policies on bullying:

    Ask the camp director and counselors about the procedures that are in place and how parents are informed. Ask how camps proactively address the issue. Ask how campers are supervised between activities.

    Talk to your kids:

    Discuss bullying with your child and keep those communications lines open!... Continue Reading
    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: June 17, 2013
    Child attending public school

    In Howard County, Maryland, we knew we needed to tackle bullying and cyber-harassment, after a few serious incidents focused our attention and raised awareness of these problems in our community. We examined current laws and discussed whether to push for new state legislation. We looked at how our public schools collect reports of bullying and later, how they handle them.

    After much study and discussion, we decided on a multi-faceted approach that brings together a variety of community partners and offers a comprehensive way forward.  We announced our plan on May 1 and now, are looking forward to seeing the results.

    The plan involves three parts:

    First, we want to change what people think and feel about bullying. We will develop a social marketing campaign to make sure adults and children know about the severe effects of bullying and what to do when it occurs.... Continue Reading
    Posted in Response
  • Posted: February 21, 2013

    Bullying can happen anywhere. It can happen in person, online, or behind your back. But there are some groups that are at higher risk.

    Erin Reiney is the Director of Injury and Violence Prevention at the Health Resources and Service’s Administration (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). She leads HRSA’s Bullying Prevention efforts, and serves as project officer for the MCHB Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Resource Center Consortium and the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: January 22, 2013
    No Name Calling Week

    The Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA) is proud of its long history of working with the Gay, Lesbian and Straight Education Network (GLSEN) and other student groups to promote healthy kids and safe schools. These partnerships are a great chance for HRSA to reach youth in their schools and community to prevent bullying. Over the years, HRSA and GLSEN have shared resources and spoken at events. This year, we are continuing that work on social media for GLSEN’s No Name Calling Week. Continue Reading

  • Posted: January 15, 2013
    Two mothers talk

    Late one Tuesday night, I received a text from the mother of my son’s friend. She told me that we needed to talk NOW; would I call her? Two weeks earlier, my 15-year-old son had broken down in tears over the harassment he was receiving at school. What I did not know, but learned from the mother who contacted me, was that my son had come very close to attempting suicide the night before. The actions of friends may indeed have saved my son’s life. My husband and I knew “Jake” was hurting inside. Continue Reading

    Posted in Warning Signs
  • Posted: January 3, 2013
    An angry preschool boy

    Bullying among young children is not uncommon. When young children–who often differ in physical size, skill level, and family experience–get together, patterns of hurtful behavior often emerge.

    Children may be mean to each other by making mean faces, saying threatening things, grabbing objects, pushing others aside, or refusing to play with others. Some young children may engage in actual bullying behaviors by deliberately and repeatedly dominating a vulnerable child by name-calling, physical attacks, and excluding others from playing with them. Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: December 28, 2012

    Bullying can happen anywhere. It can happen in person, online, or behind your back. But there are some groups that are at higher risk.

    Erin Reiney is the Director of Injury and Violence Prevention at the Health Resources and Service’s Administration (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). She leads HRSA’s Bullying Prevention efforts, and serves as project officer for the MCHB Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Resource Center Consortium and the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
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