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  • Posted: August 6, 2015
    Adult and children coloring with crayons

    The earlier we start, the better the outcomes. Brain scientists, educators, economists and public health experts agree that the foundation for healthy relationships begins at birth. The earlier children can adapt and develop critical social-emotional skills – like attentiveness, persistence and impulse control – the earlier they can engage in healthy social interactions with their peers.

    Given the tremendous amount of social and cognitive development that occurs from birth through age 5, it is no wonder there is a growing body of research which shows that even very young children can be at risk for bullying. Before characterizing situations among young children as “bullying,” however, it is especially critical to recognize that... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: June 24, 2015
    Teen girl comforting friend

    Bullying is more than a problem of one child bullying another. The power imbalance that defines bullying is also reflected in classroom social relations. Whereas those who bully are frequently considered “cool” or popular, their targets are “uncool” are typically rejected by classmates.

    Those who witness bullying play a key role in reinforcing and maintaining the social imbalance. Although in studies most students report that they disapprove of bullying, they are unlikely to stand up for the bullied, even if they feel sorry for them.  They may be reluctant to get involved because they feel anxious about their own safety or social status. Most importantly, when no one... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: June 3, 2015
    children pointing at sad child

    May 15-June 15 is Tourette Syndrome Awareness Month. This year’s theme is Everyone Can Play a Role! Learn the facts about tics and Tourette syndrome (TS), and how you can play a role to stop bullying of children with TS.

    Bullying doesn’t just happen to the smallest kid in the class. Children who bully others target those who seem to be less powerful or not as strong. Children who bully others also often target children who seem ’different.’ Children with TS are often seen as ‘different.’

    TS is a condition of the nervous system that causes people to have tics. Tics are sudden twitches, movements, or sounds that people do repeatedly. People who have tics cannot stop their body from doing these things. Having tics is a little bit like having hiccups. Even though you might not want to hiccup, your body does it anyway. Sometimes people can stop themselves from doing... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: December 17, 2014
    child and mother hugging

    Division of Violence Prevention, National Center for Injury Prevention and Control, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention

    Parents help their kids form healthy relationships that last a lifetime.  Kids whose parents monitor their behavior and have consistent rules are more likely to have healthy and close relationships with their peers, be more engaged in school, have higher self-esteem, and are less likely to bully others.  The earlier parents begin using positive parenting skills, the better. Positive parenting practices, like consistent expectations and good parent-child communication, lead to better outcomes for children throughout their lives. It’s important to remember that preventing problem behavior in your toddlers and preschoolers is one of the best ways to decrease chances that your child will be involved in violence and bullying in elementary school... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: November 5, 2014
    kid alone in school hallway

    Bullying is wrong and must not be tolerated. The sad reality, though, is that bullying persists in our schools today, especially for America's 6.75 million students with disabilities in our public schools.  Bullying raises civil rights concerns under Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act and Title II of the Americans with Disabilities Act, which are two federal laws that prohibit disability discrimination. 

    The U.S. Department of Education's Office for Civil Rights (OCR) investigates and resolves complaints of disability discrimination at public schools. OCR recently issued guidance to public schools (available in Spanish) to help... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: October 15, 2014
    3 people on a conference call

    In the post below, Tom Cochran and Lee Hirsch discuss their new joint initiative to spark action on bullying prevention nationwide.

    Lansing Mayor Virg Bernero (Left), Lansing School District (LSD) Public Safety Director Cordelia Black (Middle), LSD Superintendent Yvonne Caamal Canul (Right), along with LSD Student Services Director Susan Land (not pictured) and Mayoral Staff Assistant Nicholas Soucy (not pictured) on the phone with The BULLY Project Team planning their campaign.

    October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month and in more than 200 cities across the country, communities and their leaders are coming together to take action against bullying.  

    In the 2011 school year, 28 percent of kids between the... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: September 30, 2014
    Young boy holds a sign announcing "October is Bullying Prevention Awareness Month."

    October is National Bullying Prevention Awareness Month and it’s a good time for schools (including personnel and students), communities, districts, and states to take stock of current efforts to reduce and prevent bullying. Do current school climates make students feel safe, allowing them to thrive academically and socially? Are youth comfortable speaking up if they are being bullied? Are members of the community engaged and are the media aware of best practices when it comes to reporting bullying stories?

    In recognition of the efforts to improve school climate and reduce rates of bullying nationwide, the Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention (FPBP) are proud to release a variety of resources aimed at informing youth, those who work with youth, members of the media, parents, and schools. These resources and more... Continue Reading

  • Posted: September 16, 2014
    Students, families and educators in Baltimore work together to support student success and school improvement efforts through Connect for Respect and other community resources.

    Mary Pat King is the Director of Programs and Partnerships at the National Parent Teacher Association (PTA). In this role, Mary Pat has helped develop new strategies for engaging parents and students as leaders in efforts to improve school climate, and as a result, prevent bullying in communities nationwide.

    The National Parent Teacher Association (PTA) is committed to ensuring all children can learn in a safe school environment that is free of bullying. Research indicates that the most effective bullying prevention efforts build a culture of caring and respect throughout the school community, rather than focusing attention only on children who bully and those who are bullied. That’s why over the past several years, we’ve worked with StopBullying.gov and other... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: August 18, 2014
    Know Bullying App from SAMHSA

    Parents and caregivers are a child’s first and best teacher. Your child is listening and remembering your advice, even when it seems like he/she is not paying attention. In fact, spending 15 minutes a day listening and talking with your child can help build the foundation for a strong relationship and provide reassurance that he/she can come to you with a problem. It can also help your child recognize and respond to bullying.

    So, what will you say? KnowBullying, a new mobile app by the Substance Abuse and Mental Health Services Administration (SAMHSA), can help get the conversation started. The app provides tips on talking about school, work, relationships, life, and bullying. You can help prevent bullying and increase communication with your child while making dinner, shopping, or anytime you and your child have 15 minutes together. The app also... Continue Reading

  • Posted: February 24, 2014
    A multi-cultural adoptive family

    It is the rare adopted child who has not received questions and comments about adoption. They come from people who know them or from complete strangers:

    “Do you know anything about your ‘real’ parents?” “Why were you adopted?” “Do you want to find your ‘real’ parents?” or “How come you don’t look like your parents?”   

    Some people ask adopted kids questions because they are being friendly or curious. Most are unaware of the embarrassment and pain their questions or comments may cause. Other kids may intentionally attempt to tease or bully an adopted youth. Their comments can be painful. These questions often go right to the heart of adoptees’ self-concept and self-esteem, challenging who they are and where they belong.  This may mirror the exact questions that adopted children may be pondering... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups

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