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Category Archives for Elementary school

  • Posted: April 24, 2013
    As part of the G.R.E.A.T. program, law enforcement officers teach students skills to avoid delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership.
    As part of the G.R.E.A.T. program, law enforcement officers teach students skills to avoid delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership.

    Bullying prevention is a community endeavor. The more resources a community can use to address the problem, the better the chances of having a real impact. Most communities focus their bullying reduction efforts on addressing the problem in their schools.

    G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education And Training) is an evidence-based gang and violence prevention program. Taught by law enforcement officers, G.R.E.A.T. teaches students skills to... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: December 28, 2012

    Bullying can happen anywhere. It can happen in person, online, or behind your back. But there are some groups that are at higher risk.

    Erin Reiney is the Director of Injury and Violence Prevention at the Health Resources and Service’s Administration (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). She leads HRSA’s Bullying Prevention efforts, and serves as project officer for the MCHB Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Resource Center Consortium and the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 30, 2012
    A pair of glasses rest on a research book in front of man on a computer

    From a very early age, we pick up on important social cues that benefit us throughout school, and even into our working lives. These cues include standing at an appropriate distance, not touching the person in front of you, and even using the right volume when speaking. These basic skills are essential for functioning socially. Children with autism often do not pick up on the same cues as other children can, which can make them vulnerable to bullying.

    Recently, children with autism have caught national attention because of the bullying that happens to them. A 2012 study ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: September 11, 2012

    At the third Federal Partners in Bullying Prevention Summit, attendees asked for ways to easily access and understand the latest research on bullying. In an effort to respond to this request, the StopBullying.gov blog will from time-to-time feature briefs of recent research reports published in some of the top-tier research journals.

    Many factors place students at risk for being bullied. Research published in the American Journal of Public Health finds that kids and teens from poor families are more likely to be bullied than others. The study, which surveyed over 160,000 students from nearly 6,000 schools in Europe and North America, also concluded that schools with the largest economic inequality (or a big difference... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: August 16, 2012

    When federal leaders began a major effort to raise awareness about bullying prevention, it seemed that for every parent, teacher and community advocate who supported our mission, there was another to insist that bullying was either a normal part of growing up or “kids just being kids.”

    Eleven years later, a lot has changed.

    At the Health Resources and Services Administration (HRSA), we’ve done our part by connecting leaders on the ground with the resources they need to educate the public about the effects of bullying behavior and how to prevent it in schools and communities.

    This summer, we continue our work.

    Through a partnership with the American Camp Association (ACA), we are supplying free bullying prevention materials to more than 100 of ACA’s Explore 30 Camps. Explore 30 is a new ACA program designed to address the threat that children who are not engaged in challenging, interesting, and fun activities in the summertime will return to school in the fall having forgotten much of what they learned in the previous academic year.

    To support... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention

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