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Category Archives for Elementary school

  • Posted: July 22, 2014
    Teen Advocate Mike Sousane

    The You Have The Power! Bullying Prevention Peer Education Project (YHTP!) is a 10-week after-school program where trained high school age youth mentors, with adult supervision, teach elementary and middle school students about the characteristics, risks, and consequences of bullying, and bullying prevention.

    For a number of reasons, people can approach the issue of bullying with apathy and skepticism. They may feel it is not an important issue because they don’t have personal experiences with bullying or don’t recognize when it happens in their communities. Or they may view bullying as typical and expected behavior, or a developmental “rite of passage” for young people.

    However, it is possible for a person’s apathy and skepticism to shift into awareness, conviction, compassion, and action.... Continue Reading

  • Posted: June 30, 2014
    Girl swimming in public pool.

    Natasha Herring, a manager with D.C. Department of Parks and Recreation (DPR), recently got involved with StopBullying.gov when she identified a unique need to address bullying in her local parks and facilities. The post below reflects her story on how D.C. Parks and Recreation is taking action to prevent bullying. Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: April 3, 2014
    School students raise Stop Bullying: Speak Up flag at their school.

    Understanding what excites and concerns youth is one of the critical ingredients to Cartoon Network’s success. That’s why we knew we had to act when we learned that nearly 85 percent of our youth audience was concerned about bullying and needed information on how to prevent it.

    When we first launched Stop Bullying: Speak Up, we saw a great opportunity to make kids smarter about bullying and to also strengthen our connection with kids and families. Our goal was to develop an awareness campaign designed to provide resources for parents, kids and educators and explain in simple terms, the variety of ways people can take action to resolve the bullying issue and prevent it from happening. But like many things in... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: August 23, 2013
    A teacher talks to her class.

    As Secretary Duncan has noted, the Department of Education is committed to making sure that all of our young people grow up free of fear, violence, and bullying. Bullying not only threatens a student’s physical and emotional safety at school, but fosters a climate of fear and disrespect, creating conditions that negatively impact learning—undermining students’ ability to achieve to their full potential. Unfortunately, we know that children with disabilities are disproportionately affected by bullying.

    Factors such as physical vulnerability, social skills challenges, or intolerant environments may increase the risk of bullying. Students who are targets of bullying are more likely to experience lower academic achievement, higher truancy rates, feelings of alienation, poor peer relationships, loneliness, and depression. We must do... Continue Reading

    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: July 30, 2013
    Kids at play

    Its summertime! School’s out and there is a good chance that your kids will be spending some time at summer camp.  Whether its sports camp, adventure camp, music camp, or any of the other amazing arrays of camps available to kids these days, most camps are equipped to understand and address bullying.  As parents and caretakers, here are some tips to help have a conversation with your child and with camp staff if you suspect bullying may be taking place.

    Find out about camp policies on bullying:

    Ask the camp director and counselors about the procedures that are in place and how parents are informed. Ask how camps proactively address the issue. Ask how campers are supervised between activities.

    Talk to your kids:

    Discuss bullying with your child and keep those communications lines open!... Continue Reading
    Posted in Specific Groups
  • Posted: July 1, 2013

    Although bullying can occur among individuals of any weight, overweight and underweight children tend to be at higher risk for bullying. Targets of verbal bullying based on weight, sometimes referred to as “weight teasing,” can experience a number of negative consequences, including a change in body perception.

    Weight teasing by both family and peers has been associated with high levels of anxiety and low self-esteem among adolescents. Having low self-esteem because of peer criticism can change an individual’s body image. Body image is the positive or negative feelings you have about the way you look. Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors
  • Posted: June 17, 2013
    Child attending public school

    In Howard County, Maryland, we knew we needed to tackle bullying and cyber-harassment, after a few serious incidents focused our attention and raised awareness of these problems in our community. We examined current laws and discussed whether to push for new state legislation. We looked at how our public schools collect reports of bullying and later, how they handle them.

    After much study and discussion, we decided on a multi-faceted approach that brings together a variety of community partners and offers a comprehensive way forward.  We announced our plan on May 1 and now, are looking forward to seeing the results.

    The plan involves three parts:

    First, we want to change what people think and feel about bullying. We will develop a social marketing campaign to make sure adults and children know about the severe effects of bullying and what to do when it occurs.... Continue Reading
    Posted in Response
  • Posted: April 24, 2013
    As part of the G.R.E.A.T. program, law enforcement officers teach students skills to avoid delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership.
    As part of the G.R.E.A.T. program, law enforcement officers teach students skills to avoid delinquency, youth violence, and gang membership.

    Bullying prevention is a community endeavor. The more resources a community can use to address the problem, the better the chances of having a real impact. Most communities focus their bullying reduction efforts on addressing the problem in their schools.

    G.R.E.A.T. (Gang Resistance Education And Training) is an evidence-based gang and violence prevention program. Taught by law enforcement officers, G.R.E.A.T. teaches students skills to... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: December 28, 2012

    Bullying can happen anywhere. It can happen in person, online, or behind your back. But there are some groups that are at higher risk.

    Erin Reiney is the Director of Injury and Violence Prevention at the Health Resources and Service’s Administration (HRSA) Maternal and Child Health Bureau (MCHB). She leads HRSA’s Bullying Prevention efforts, and serves as project officer for the MCHB Sudden Unexpected Infant Death (SUID) Resource Center Consortium and the Children’s Safety Network National Resource Center.... Continue Reading

    Posted in Prevention
  • Posted: October 30, 2012
    A pair of glasses rest on a research book in front of man on a computer

    From a very early age, we pick up on important social cues that benefit us throughout school, and even into our working lives. These cues include standing at an appropriate distance, not touching the person in front of you, and even using the right volume when speaking. These basic skills are essential for functioning socially. Children with autism often do not pick up on the same cues as other children can, which can make them vulnerable to bullying.

    Recently, children with autism have caught national attention because of the bullying that happens to them. A 2012 study ... Continue Reading

    Posted in Risk Factors

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